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What to Pack For a Weekend Getaway


As we approach the holiday madness time of the year, you may be itching to get out of town for one last non-family getaway.  Whether you’re planning a weekend trip to somewhere warm or heading north for some crisp, cool air, denim is the one fabric you can pack that will work for all occasions and all climates. Sticking with lower-waist and boot cuts are ideal for women, while men should pack their favorite relaxed fit, darker-wash duds. Here’s a look at our favorite picks for your beach bolts and snowy sabbaticals that will look great and be comfortable for traveling.

vacayjeansBDG Ankle Cigarette Mid-Rise, UNIQLO Men’s Relaxed-Fit Straight, 7 For All Mankind Original Bootcut

—Sarah Greene

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Posted Nov 10 2011 in Denim Fashion » Denim Menswear » How to Wear It

Denim Trivia: How To Say “Jeans” In (Almost) Every Language


We love to travel, and we love denim. So it only makes sense that we’d brush up on ways to say “jeans” the world over, so that we may inquire with locals in various countries as per where to score some international denim. Going somewhere soon? Take a look at this list below for a rundown of languages and the translation of the J word.

how to say jeans in every language denim

In Greek jeans are known as τζίν.
Editor’s note: One of our Greek friends suggests “τζινς or τζινζ” instead.

In Bulgarian jeans are known as дънки (Bulgarian transliteration of donkey, but perhaps from English “dungarees”).

In Chinese niuzaiku (SC: 牛仔裤, TC: 牛仔褲), literally, “cowboy pants” (trousers), indicating their association with the American West, cowboy culture, and outdoors work.

In Danish cowboybukser meaning “cowboy pants”.

In Dutch, jeans are often known as ‘spijkerbroek’ meaning “nail trousers”, referring to the copper studs on riveted jeans.

In Finnish, jeans are usually known as “farkut”, short for “farmarihousut” (“farmer’s trousers” in English.)

In Hungarian name for jeans is “farmer” (short for “farmernadrág”, meaning “farmer’s trousers”).

In Korean, jeans are known as “cheong baji” (청바지), meaning “blue trousers”.

In Norwegian “dongeribukse” or “olabukse”. “Dongeri” is adapted from English “dungaree,” and “bukse” is Norwegian for “pants”. The prefix Ola is used to describe the average Norwegian person. According to the Norwegian Language Council, the term “olabukse” was coined by Tor Wessel Kildal, when introducing jeans to Norwegian consumers, targeting young males (10-12 years).

In Puerto Rican Spanish as mahones.

In Serbian jeans are known as “фармерке” or “farmerke” (Serbian transliteration of farmer’s trousers).

In Spanish they are mostly known as jeans, but are also called vaqueros (“cowboys”) or tejanos (“Texans”).

In Arabic they are pronounced as English but in Arabic letters جينز

In Turkish as “kot”

In Polish as “dżins” pronounced like in English

In Slovak language as džínsy

In Russian as “джинсы”

In Slovene (or Slovenian) “jeans” are called normally: kavbojke (which comes from kavboj (Engl.: cowboy), so the “trousers worn by cowboys”), or also džins. ** Reader submission from Sara
Information from Jeans.

 

As a side note, where phonetic translations are missing, we will be filling in shortly! If you know a missing phonetic translation, let us know!

—Michelle Christina Larsen

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Posted Oct 14 2011 in Denim Therapy
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